swim

I Did Not Climb a Mountain Today

Teena fat 2016I am not climbing Carrauntoohil today. I am in Kerry, I am in Killarney, I am staying at the Mountain Lodge of explorer, adventurer and mountain mentor Pat Falvey; but I am still not climbing Carrauntoohil today.

Pat has a group going up alright; all anxious and excited with crampons and ice-axes, in search of snow and ice in Curved Gulley. I envy them a little, but I am not going with them. I haven’t been on a hill for a couple of months, and halfway through a six hour hike in winter conditions is not the time to discover you’re not hill fit. Especially when you know the answer before you start.

I did get the invitation to join them though, and I couldn’t resist the lure of at least walking in to the foothills.

I had a late and sociable night, finally rolling into my duvet around 2am. When the alarm kicked up a racket at 7am it was still inky dark outside. I shivered, punched my pillow, and considered rolling back into the arms of sleep. A little part of me wondered ‘what was the point of joining the hike if I wasn’t going to climb the mountain’.

The smell of Continue reading

Swimming Up A Mountain..

The beautiful mineral blue waters of Lake Cummeenoughter have fascinated me for many years, ever since I spotted the corrie lake on one of my first hikes up Carrauntoohil with mountain ‘mentor’, Irish adventurer Pat Falvey. Depending on light and conditions I have seen the lake sparkling emerald green, deep cobalt blue, and ominously Continue reading

Highest Swim in Ireland 

I love mountains and I love to swim, but I rarely get to combine the two – until now.

I don’t consider myself a great swimmer, but when I start thinking about my watery moments, I’m suprised to see how much a part of me they are.

  I’m not a great swimmer but I swim a great deal.

The Eastern Bay Swimming Club take to the sea at High Rock Malahide every Sunday at noon, and I join them when I can. This year I’ve been feeling Continue reading

Bright as a Larke for 2015…

RNLI threesome

This time last year a very good friend of mine and fellow ‘weight warrior’ completed  a one-kilometre Reindeer Walk for the RNLI and kick started a life-changing year, in which her 50th birthday suit featured greatly and frequently! Get ready to raise your glass to my guest blogger -a lady who truly does ‘Dream, Dare and Do’ – Averil Larke.

Averil writes:

Two days to go until the end of 2014 and I’m Continue reading

Don’t Flip Out Over Your Back Stroke…

photo by stevesdigicams.comI don’t remember not being able to swim. That doesn’t mean I’m a brilliant swimmer or anything, it just means I’ve always swum for as long as I can remember. But I have to say, taking proper swimming lessons with Karl McEntegart at DCU has been a revelation and such a rewarding thing to do.

Over the last few months he’s been ironing out lots of little faults in my swim technique and showing me why I do certain things, and why some things are more effective. I had a long break out of the pool when I was off climbing mountains in Russia and Spain during the summer (tough life) but getting back into training this month,  I found my split times were better than when we started and I was really thrilled with that.  That’s progress.

Today was yet another Eureka moment, when we had a look at my Continue reading

A Mermaid In The Making…

IMG_4872.JPGI’ve just had my 4th swimming lesson with Karl McEntegart at DCU and I really feel I’m making progress. In fact it’s not just a feeling – I can clearly see the difference – from 63 mins in the water for my 1st sea race in July, to 36 mins for my 4th race a month later!

I don’t remember not being able to swim. Like walking, it’s just something I always remember doing. My mum used to tell me that my dad left me sitting on a rock at the beach in Tramore and the tide came in and knocked me off. I don’t know if that’s true, but she claimed I was a toddler at the time, and I doggy paddled back to the shore before anyone could reach me. I love the mermaid feel to the story, so I’m going to claim it and refuse to forensically examine it too closely!

You’d imagine with my ‘mermaid-style’ start to life, that I’d be a strong swimmer. Well I’m not. I’m a comfortable swimmer. I have never struggled in water, never felt tired or sore while swimming, never felt afraid. In fact, when I was 23 stone, being in the water was a very happy place for me. I could hide my body under the surface of the waves and imagine I was beautiful. That mermaid thing again…

Have I Made A Huge Mistake?

It wasn’t until I tried my 1st sea-race this July that I realised how far out of my depth I really was. Struggling to breathe as the waves slapped me in the face, I really began to think I’d made a huge mistake. Everyone else was out of the water and gone home, all but the last of the big orange marker buoys had been taken out of the water, and to my embarrassment I was now on 1st name terms with the rescue boat, who kept asking if I needed a lift! They were probably hoping I’d give up, call it a day, and let everyone go IMG_5284.JPGhome to their tea… I realised afterwards that race means, well, race! I had never swam against a clock before, never attempted to be fast before. I would happily swim all day, but I wasn’t actually going anywhere. Throw a choppy sea and a turning tide into the mix and you begin to see why I was twice the length of time in the water than the svelte creatures who had flown past me at the first marker.

I realised I had work to do and that was when I started my pool lessons with Karl. He is brilliant at correcting my technique without overwhelming me, and I go away enthusiastically anxious to try out each new trick. Joining the Eastern Bay Swimming Club pool nights has also been a revelation. An hour of swimming lengths against the clock. It’s tough and it’s slightly soul destroying because I’m at least a length behind everyone else in my lane. But I know the only way I can shorten that distance is to keep going.

Each of my 4 sea races have been an education too. Dealing with tides and currents, wind, cold and the dreaded jellyfish. It’s been a tough year to get involved with sea racing. It’s been really stormy, there have been water quality issues, and there have been a staggering amount of jellyfish, including the big bad boy sort, that you hear warnings about on the radio.

Will Curiosity Kill The Cat?

So why this year? Why keep pushing so hard? If I’m honest, it’s because I had a dream. I’ve always been fascinated with Dublin’s iconic
annual river race – the Liffey Swim. While doing ‘kayak rescue cover’ for the swimmers last year I had a sneaky curiosity about whether I would ever be able to swim it too. I swam in the sea all last winter with Eastern Bay, but I was staying close to shore and not pushing any distance. Then I came back to Dublin in July after climbing Elbrus and the thought of having a go at the Liffey just refused to go away.IMG_5361-0.JPG

Which brings me to today’s lesson. After race one, I didn’t think I’d have a chance. You need to complete 4 open-sea races to even qualify to join the starting line for the Liffey Swim. Well I’ve done that. Somewhat to my own surprise, I have my races in. I could have given up at race one, but I didn’t,
and it’s a lesson on the value of just staying on in there. I’m still slow, but I’m not as slow as I was, and I’m improving all the time.

Today I drove over to Dublin 4 to hand-deliver my entry form for the Liffey Swim. I’ve worked so hard to complete those qualifying races that I was afraid to trust the form to
the post. The funny thing is, I bumped into the postman along the way and he had a bunch of
envelopes that were clearly other forms headed for the same address. We ended up having a fine chat about sea swimming, the Liffey Swim, and me apologising for my unwarranted lack of faith in the postal system. Nice bloke and only in Ireland…

So now the race is on.
I’m not racing against the other swimmers – I’m racing against myself. The Liffey Swim on September 13th is 2,500 metres against the tide. That’s 1,000 metres more than I’ve swum so far, and there’s a one-hour cut off. I have qualified to enter, but I still have a lot of work to do to complete the swim within the given time.

I have two weeks, I have Karl, I have Eastern Bay and I have a stubborn desire to be a mermaid.

Wish me luck…

 

 

 

From Lake to Sea to Saddle…

GlendaloughLakeaThree years hoofing it around the horse-shoe at Spinc Mountain in Wicklow and looking down with a lump in my throat at the beautiful Upper Lake at Glendalough.  My first sight of the lake from the observation point half way up the mountain, marked a turning point for me 3 years ago.  I was 19 stone at that point and had already lost 4 stone, which had enabled me to go hiking for the first time.  I knew then as I looked down from my mountain perch that I’d be climbing mountains for ever more.

The lake continued to intrigue me each time I’d go hiking to Spinc, but I largely obeyed the ‘no swimming’ signs keeping hot and sweaty hikers at bay.  Then a couple of weeks ago, I spotted on the internet that there’s an annual swimming race in the lake.  I had just two weeks to train and register, really not enough, but there was a 750m category and I knew I’d swum that distance a couple of years ago in the ‘lake’ stage of a triathlon at Lough Key Forest Park.  At the time I had trained with Eastern Bay swimmer & English Channel and North Channel crosser, Fergal Somerville.  This time I wouldn’t even have time for a quick swim with the gang at High Rock in Malahide before the lake.   I pondered my options.  I might be a bit rusty for the job, but I still couldn’t resist the temptation of swimming in that lake.  I signed up.

Trade Descriptions Act…

I may have dreamed of cutting through the mirror-like glassy surface of  Upper Lake – but those dreams never included rain and a gale blowing through the valley and whipping up choppy waves on the expanse of water that disappeared into the thick mist at the top of the valley.  The picture on the website was more like the scenes of my imagination than the reality when Saturday morning broke and I felt like challenging the advert under the trade descriptions act!  I could hardly see the road as I drove through the Sallygap on my way to Glendalough.  Sheer misery.  The organisers had warned that we may be asked to wear wetsuits if the water temperature glendaloughdipped, and while I was happy to swim in just a suit, I’ve got to admit – when I saw the other swimmers getting wet-suited, it didn’t take me too long to follow their example.  Shivering on the beach as the wind blew down the bouncy-castle style ‘starting gate’ – I wondered if anyone would notice if I slipped away.  But it was only a passing whinge and shortly I was striding down to the water’s edge, listening to the briefing and hoping secretly that I wouldn’t be the one that single-handedly delayed the start of the second race, by having to be rescued from the middle of the lake.   Stepping into the brown, peaty, water I was pleasantly surprised. It didn’t feel too cold at all, I’d guess about 15 or 16 degrees.  I walked to my waist then pushed off, we all bounced about in the water a bit, getting used to the feel of it, before we got the count and we were off.

I learned a bit since my first outdoor swimming race,  and hung to the back and side, letting the sharks fly off ahead.  It saved me getting a toe in the face, or getting physically pushed down in the water as the speedy types swam over me.   I struck out confidently, happy that I knew the job ahead.  We had to swim out past 2 yellow marker buoys, then across the lake to a third and back to the fourth to finish.   The lake was choppy and waves broke in my face, forcing me to time my breathing carefully and be ready to adjust my breathing rhythm.  I could see a couple of the swimmers were finding it tough going but to be honest, I was in my element.  Swimming with the Eastern Bay club off Malahide is perfect training for these rough, choppy conditions, and I thoroughly enjoyed it.   I was never going to be fast, but I felt strong and felt like I was flying as I made my way down the lake, eating up the buoys.  I turned to go across to marker 3, prepared to feel a different current with the cross, and it was fine.  I turned for home and felt the familiar swell of a current coming behind me, picking me up and throwing me forward.  I knew this dlhar3feeling too, all good.  I picked off the last buoy and turned for the finish.  Suddenly I had a moment.   Mentally something changed.  In hindsight I think I had told myself the last buoy was the end of the race, and I suddenly got a bit of a shock when I sighted the finish and saw I still had a bit of work to do.  My breathing got ragged and for the first time I lost my confidence.  I swung over onto my back and took a couple of deep breaths.  I rolled back over and had another look, just as one of the safety kayakers edged over to check if I was ok.  I heard myself shouting back that I was fine, it was ‘my head, not my body’ that had the problem.  I realised that was true and to my shame I started to doggy paddle, while I gave myself a swift, mental, kick in the ass.  Then I had head down and was pushing forward again – all the way to the finish.  Despite my little crisis, I made it back in less than half an hour, which was my target.  So job done, and lessons learned.  Next time I’ll train!

After Glendalough, it was on to Bray – to Brennanstown Riding Stables to go trekking with friends. It certainly was a great way to warm up after the lake swim.  Brendan the instructor had me in stitches laughing as we rode out for a couple of hours through more of my gorgeous Wicklow.  He has good taste, he listens to Dublin’s best radio station, my own 98FM!  There was great irony going downhill on horseback.  For the past year, Dave, my kayak instructor at Wild Water Kayak Club has been yelling at me to ‘lean forward’  in my kayak, as we fly down the weirs on the River Liffey.  The opposite is true on horseback, and it amused me greatly to hear Brendan shouting at me to ‘lean back’  in my saddle, as we wound down the hills.dh4

Saturday finished with a hog roast at the Garda Boat Club in Chapelizod to mark the 50th anniversary of the Wild Water Kayak Club.  A brilliant night arranged by a great bunch of people, and really interesting to see the old film footage of Dalkey where the club was originally founded.  The things they put to sea in!  The film gave me extra confidence for the following day when I was taking my river kayak out into Dunlaoghaire Harbour to help with boat-cover for the Dunlaoghaire Harbour Swim.  It was a long day but it was a great experience and it all goes towards my training for the LauraLynn Liffey Descent.  The water was quite choppy out near the lighthouse, but Sásta Sage, my Sasta sponsored training kayak didn’t let me down and we cut through it really well.  I was glad to be in a kayak and ON the water rather than IN it this time.  That really is quite a swim and it was inspiring to be involved with these amazing people.  My Eastern Bay swimming pals were strongly represented in the Harbour Swim, as well as some of my work colleagues.  GOTC Swimming mentor and buddy, Fergal Somerville was back in action – coming 12th in the overall mens’ race, as well as 1st Vet and winner of the Kevin Darby Trophy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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