obesity

The Photo of a Thousand Knives….  

Before and After…

If you’ve been big, like me, you probably have whole years of your life without a single photo reference.  When I was writing my book, after escaping from the prison of my 23 stone body, I had to beg for ‘big’ photos from my friends and relations to document the ‘before’.  I’d cleansed them you see, completely erased every large unflattering print of myself, to complete my denial that I was obese and getting bigger.  

The Power Within…

Lately I’ve been bouncing out of my skin with delight at my growing fitness and strength. After a dodgy winter with the weight piling back on, I’ve been back out on the wilderness trail, climbing mountains and running; working hard to reverse the damage. Finally this week, the results began to show. I felt the power building in me, my lungs burning less when I run, my calves burning less when I climb. On Friday I joined a night-hike on the Sugarloaf with the Oldtown Road IMG_9218.JPGTrailbreakers. On Saturday myself and some old mountain buddies climbed Leinster’s highest peak, Lugnaquilla, with Ronan Friel from Irish Guided Walks, surprising ourselves by finding snow at the summit. I stayed overnight in Wicklow to join the mighty JuJu Jay from ‘Mud, Sweat and Runners’ for a beginner trail run on Sunday, and accepted an invitation to go sea-swimming at the 40ft in Dublin for St Patrick’s Day.

Then came the photo of a thousand knives. Casually taken and innocently posted on Facebook, it was a photo like the photos that had haunted my past. Caught at a vulnerable moment, legs akimbo, muscles slack, crudely placed limbs facing into the camera, and worst of all, a glimpse of pain and discomfort in my eyes as my rusty old joints complained at their treatment. A horrible image that burned into my heart and soul and poked open the scars on wounds considered long healed.

Lycra or Bust…

I am often asked how I exercise when I’m heavy, if I am embarrassed, or how can I bring myself to wear Lycra or a swimsuit? Yes of course there is an element of ‘cringe’. If I am out running and kids jeer me, it hurts; but I’m usually too out of breath to answer back! Besides, the best response is to just keep running.

Juju Jay Hugz

Juju Jay Hugz

Mostly I just breathe deeply and get on with it. Knowing the freedom of being strong enough to get out and enjoy the great outdoors, is worth the effort. But occasionally there are setbacks when it all seems pointless, when I see defeat looming and feel the temptation to lie down in front of that wave of sadness and just give up. This was one of those moments. In the middle of a busy, active, fun weekend; my heart leapt and my breathing caught as I fought to keep my eyes from watering. My personal ‘pity-party’ gathered pace as looking at this horrid image, my confidence disintegrated around me. Is this how I look in my unguarded moments? A ridiculous caricature of the person I see in the mirror. Chewing on my upset, a timely call from a good friend gives me a chance to vent my sadness. Heading to bed somewhat earlier than expected, I suddenly feel tired and old and foolish.

Waking up this morning in Wicklow where my soul usually soars, I started out for my run with JuJu Jay with a stubborn reluctance in my step.  It felt pointless. ‘Fat people can’t run’ I told myself. Except a sneaky voice in my head insisted that if I ran, I’d feel better.

I got JuJu’d…

JuJu’s chirpy greeting and jokey instructions have me loosening up my joints and my mind, before I have a chance toIMG_9224.JPG bolt. Within minutes we’re running.  Beginners trotting out into the woods, at different levels and stages. When my breathing gets heavy, JuJu’s practical advice cuts through my embarrassment, and before long my head is up, my pace has slowed and I’ve found my rhythm.  Not fast, not slow, but just right. Like Goldilocks, I’ve found what works for me.

Sometimes life knocks you out of rhythm, and like trail-running up a hill through a forest, you need to tune out the confusion, focus on the stillness, give yourself a hug and learn to breathe again. Thank you for today Juju Jay, and for helping me to breathe again.

 

Warning – St Pat’s BNS Could Seriously Damage Obesity…

St PatsSwapping a Wrap for a Rap….

Recently I had the pleasure of visiting St. Patrick’s Boys National School in Drumcondra to talk about the fun of getting healthy and getting active.  They are wonderful lads who know lots about sport and mountains and what happens at altitude.  They are great at science and geography, they know the height of Ireland’s highest mountain, Carrauntoohil. They are polite, enthusiastic, intelligent and very talented.  They had lots of hints for me, and explained that I’ll enjoy running more if I run with a friend, and if I run as much as I can and then run a little bit more.  They also told me it’s good to have a reason or a goal to run for.  I’ve taken their advice and accepted their challenge to run a 10k in the Phoenix Park by the end of the Summer.  They tell me that I can do it – and I believe them.  The boys also had a surprise presentation for me, and performed a couple of rap songs that they had written for me, about food and healthy eating.  Their work is so good that I just had to share the lyrics with you.  It’s a pity I didn’t bring my GoPro camera along to video them – because they were great.  Maybe next time 🙂

(Tune of ‘What does the Fox say?’)

What does the sugar say? I’m fat, I’m fat, I’m obese.

What does the sugar say? I’m fat, I’m fat, I’m obese. x3

      Carrots are good

                             Potatoes are too.                   Song

Sugar is bad

Salt will kill you!!

I wanna eat some cake

Which I’m not allowed

So let’s eat some rhubarb

Which I am allowed

                        We’ll go into the kitchen                    Rap

And take out all the junk

Get a bit of rhubarb

Add some cheese

Go into the sitting-room

And eat with ease.

Every night at tea-time

I eat bread

It is brown

Then I add some flora

                                                                               Not butter                                    song to the tune of Titanic

It is bad.

Sometimes I have white bread

But it’s full of sugar

And salt and faaat.

I live with an apple beside my bed

                                                    I can’t get this junk food out of my head.                       Tune of ‘Monster’

I’m going for runs but I keep losing my breath.

I’m trying to get fit, I’m to get fit, because I care.

Heyyyyy brother, there’s a KFC around the corner

                                          OOOOhhhh we can share a mighty bucket for 2               Tune of ‘Brother’ Avicii

Then there’s nothing in this World we couldn’t do.

Put your hands in the air if you don’t care

                                                          Eat KFC and squash your chair     (Tune of ‘Put your hands in the air’)

Do a dance, do a dance

Lose your breath AHHHH!!!

‘My Song’ (Elton John)

It’s a little bit spicy

And a little bit hot

I might need another penny to get a cookie

But then I realised you had a cookie so I ate it instead.

I hope you don’t mind, I hope you don’t mind that I ate you cookie

But it tastes so wonderful that it’s in my belly.

Now I quit junk food I put it in the thrash

I feel a lot healthier that I’m not eating hash-browns

I hope you don’t mind, I hope you don’t mind that I threw out your cookie

But it looked so tempting I couldn’t control me.

FAT Song (tune of ‘Wrecking Ball’)

We came, we ate, we did not wait

For our calories to burn

Don’t you ever say that I’m overweight

I will always crush you.

I’m the same size as a wrecking ball

I’ve never been so fat before

All I ever ate is KFC

I pretty own the company.

Someone told me about broccoli

I finally can see my knees

And I’ll be as fit as Muhammad Ali.

I have low cholesterol

I can now run to Donegal

I can now get up when I fall

I can now kick a ball.

‘Happy Feet’ Wing It…

My ‘Happy Feet’ relay team for the Lough Key triathlon was waiting for me at registration when I turned up, shoulders shrugged high, to stop the torrential rain running down my neck, realising the futility of keeping dry – when I was just about to jump in a lake!

As I walked up to the girls, I couldn’t help gawping at the big yellow markers on the water, that were clearly marking the swim.  To my eye, the markers seemed far too distant from the shore; surely they’d made a mistake?  It looked so much further than I thought 740metres would look like. There were shrieks and hugs as we met up and shared training disaster stories from the past week; but all the time I felt butterflies the size of bats in my gut. I shouldn’t have eaten breakfast, I knew I shouldn’t.  The egg and ham and goats’ cheese and spinach soufle that my host had made me, was now hanging heavily on my mind.

I was doing the swim, Teresa the cycle and Anna had been roped in at the last minute with a dodgy knee and very little notice, to cover the final 5k run.   It had all seemed so simple to offer to swim the 750m for team Happy Feet, until I read the briefing notes with just a week and a half to go, and realised there was a 30 min elimination time on the swim!  Pressure, and not enough time to train.   If you followed my training blog here, you’ll know I tried to short-cut my lack of speed-work by swimming without a wet-suit, against the tide at Malahide Beach in North Dublin.  I suppose I thought that if I made myself suffer as much hardship and discomfort as possible, I might feel more comfortable, and swim faster, when I had to get in the lake.   Well it was a theory at the time, and the only one I had!  My big problem was that although I was comfortable doing the distance,  I had no speed and was planning to complete the distance in 40mins.  The briefing notes blew that out of the water – if you’ll excuse the pun.

Well I put my shoulder to the wheel – or tide – and soaked up all the tips I could drag from my Hi-Rock swimming friends in Malahide, and in particular ‘Chanimal’ – Channel Swimmer, Fergal Somerville.  Deep, even breaths – long, measured strokes, no panic.  Now today was the day.

As the other athletes gathered in the holding pen, adjusting swim caps and goggles, stretching to warm up arms and legs and shoulders; they looked sleek and professional, I sneakily looked around comparing the size of my belly with everyone elses.  I thought mine looked much bigger, and I grimaced.  A throwback to my days of being 23stone.  These days I’m just under 12 stone and still a bit on the curvy size, but despite no longer being morbidly obese, I still have body-image flashbacks, especially when I’m standing on the shore in a screamingly tight wet suit along with 300 taller, slimmer, fitter looking people.  I just had to remind myself that I was strong and healthy and capable of taking them all on.  (I just didn’t really believe it).

The Public Address speakers crackled into life and there were speeches and applause as the rain continued to fall and we stood, shuffling our bare feet in the wet grass, wishing for the start.  Eventually we got the nod and as one, we swimmers moved towards the water.  It was all new to me, we were to get into the lake and swim to warm up, before the start was called.   I followed the leaders and reached the water’s edge, noting the lack of reaction from the other swimmers and imitating their composure as I stepped calmly into the lake, biting down a gasp at the cold.  Up to my ankles, my knees, my chest and finally I’m swimming, then finding some space to keep treading until the race ‘got the off’.  This part was unexpected, and I felt a tremor of adrenalin or something close to fear.  I was out of my depth, I couldn’t swim out with a proper stroke or I’d crash into the swimmers ahead.  I was just bobbing about getting cold, and I didn’t like it.  I determinedly removed my mind from the lake and imagined I was going through my yoga routines in the sun, and felt the warmth and the calm flood through my legs and up through my body to my arms.  I relaxed.  We’d go when we’d go – and finally the human wave washed back towards me, as the race began.

I reached out into the dark waters of the lake, pushing my head under water and noticing the pink hue of the feet in front, dyed red by the peaty flood waters.  I had taken the other swimmers’ advice and kept out of the crush at the start, for fear of being dragged or accidentally thumped in the fury of the moment.  I took my line against the yellow marker out near an island in the lake and just swam.  I didn’t try to go fast, hearing Fergal’s comments a week before, telling me that trying to go fast was the fastest way to slow down.  I wasn’t sure if he was right, but I was taking his comments on board.  After about 250 metres, the 1st marker was drawing close and I realised there was a crush emerging as the swimmers tried to get a tight line around it.  I didn’t.  I pulled left and gave it – and them – a wide berth.  I think I actually gained time instead of losing time, as I swung wide arount the buoy and the human soup, and took my line to the next marker.

I had told myself that if I was comfortable after the first 250, I would step up the speed on the 2nd leg.  It worked fine, I stretched out and increased my speed, breathing deeper into my lungs and concentrating on rolling smoothly to catch my breath, keeping my face down between strokes and pulling my arms smoothly through the water.  Quicker than I expected, I reached the second marker, and swept around to face back into the shore.  I looked up, and saw swimmers far ahead and far behind.  At my right was an orange kayak, on hand to help if I needed it.  I didn’t need it.  I saw the last marker, saw the shore, put my head down – and bombed it.  I gave the last 250 every last bit of energy and strength and felt excitement well up inside me.  I’m not sure why, I just felt powerful and thrilled because whatever the time on the clock, I wasn’t the last person in the lake, and I knew I had the energy to get me back to shore.   Stumbling out of the water, I took the waiting helping hand eagerly and pulled myself free of the lake, then sprinted to the holding paddock and my teammates.  Pulling the electronic tag from my left ankle and passing it to Teresa, I recognised she was excitedly shouting at me about the time.  I felt tears well up as I realised I’d made the 30 minutes…. and more.

Later, with the time confirmed at 22 minutes.  I joked that it was the egg and spinich ‘Pop-Eye’ breakfast after all (thanks Mary) but I was humbled.  This body of mine, that I have so abused in my lifetime, again pulled out a blinder for me.  With less than 2 weeks to prepare, it had delivered all I asked, and I had smashed my own time.   I felt like one of our Olympians, I could proudly say I had a PB and I’d smashed it!   It was hard work getting here; swimming in cold, choppy, waters off Malahide, hours of weight training in the gym on our few sunny days, and a lot of self doubt.  But the help I got, the support from my friends, from FB and Twitter, and all the generous tips and training swims I got from Fergal and his Hi-Rock mates, had paid off.  I’d made it – and Team Happy feet could run and cycle the rest of the way, without being disqualified by the swimmer!

You know, when I started training for our Concern/Uganda: hiking, cycling & kayaking challenge in November, I never thought I’d end up long-distance swimming too.  But I suppose it all helps with general fitness.  What’s next?  Well, the whole Concern group is due to climb Carrauntoohil, Ireland’s highest mountain this Sunday; and that’s going to hurt – because with all the time I’ve spent cycling, swimming, working-out in the gym and learning to kayak, I’ve somewhat neglected my hill climbing.  There is a reckoning a-coming on Sunday.   And do you know? there’s a 750m sea swim in Killiney on Saturday…..  😉

 

 

 

Hanging Out, 120ft Above the Tall Ships…

I have a terrible head for heights, and yet I keep getting myself in scrapes that involve great terror – ie: standing on surfaces heigher than my own diminutive 5ft.

Tomorrow is such a day.  Somehow I’ve agreed to climb the mast of the Polish Tall Ship, the Fryderick Chopin on the quays tomorrow, along with a gang of mates from 98FM.  That mast is 120ft high.  That didn’t mean too much to me, until I saw this photo a short time ago, posted on FB by Mountain Rescue Volunteer, Ronan Friel.  OMG.  I hope I won’t need his services tomorrow!  Hearing that gusty winds and driving rain are sweeping in from the Atlantic, doesn’t exactly make me feel much better.   Lunchtime tomorrow, it should all be over.  I just have to make it until lunchtime tomorrow.

In fairness, I kind’ve felt a bit like that all day today.  I had a bit of a whine on FB, telling my friends that  “I don’t always like exercising – and I don’t always like training on Thursdays.” Thurs mean a heavy weights session in the gym in the afternoon then kayak lessons on the Liffey in the evening.  I like Kayaking… but on Thurs they make us fall in.  It’s cold, and wet, and yucky.  I don’t like falling in… and on Thursdays I don’t always like kayaking.  🙁

As usual, after a couple of hours on the river and a couple of wettings – I feel great tonight and assured of a good night’s sleep.  The sleep of the good, and the exhausted!

The gym session today was bruising. I’m squatting and pressing and throwing around 30 to 50kgs around me, depending on the exercise.  I’m finding it tough – and I’ve stepped up the durations from 40mins to an hour.  Today I had one of those sessions where you sit in the changing room afterwards and feel slightly nauseous.  I haven’t had one of those in about a year – which probably means I needed one!

The training for Concern’s Uganda mission in November is, I think, going well.  But I could do with losing about a stone before I go, to be in best condition for coping with the heat.  That means my next project is to look again at my diet……..  once I survive the Fryderick Chopin!

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